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Summer of Science: Melting Polar Ice Caps


Being aware of your potential to impact the world  is an important lesson to learn and one that continues well into adulthood.  In this week’s Summer of Science experiments we’re broadening our ecological awareness and exploring how pollution impacts weather in the form of melting polar ice caps and acid rain. 

I think it’s important, and necessary, for children to understand and realize that the same things we’re studying in our experiments are happening in the world RIGHT NOW and eventually the end result of the experiment is going to be the end result for Earth if we don’t start changing our ways. And now, on to the experiment!

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Erin Sipes
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Summer of Science: Make a Tornado


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It never fails, what should be the most fun experiments tend to go wrong.  No worries, we still had a great time recreating our own little tornados with two empty drink bottles, colored water, and nearly half a roll of electrical tape.

 

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Summer of Science: Thunder and Lightning


recreating THUNDER

Is it just me or does lightning always looked like it’s spelled wrong, and by that I mean when it’s spelled right and when it is in fact spelled wrong?  Anyway.  This time of year we usually start experiencing severe thunderstorms, flash flooding, and even the occasional tornado, though you wouldn’t know it with the drought that’s still going on, so I thought now would be the perfect time to explain how the sounds of thunder and the crackle of lightning are created. 

These two Summer of Science experiments are super easy and lots of fun….I mean who doesn’t like to pop balloons after rubbing them on our head?

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Erin Sipes
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Summer of Science: What is Dew?


Okay, this week I’m working through some existential issues and refocusing (i.e. distracting myself) on planning our homeschooling curriculums for the 2012-2013 school year…I will be sharing later.  In the meantime, the kids and I had a day of science and, gasp, it was fun! 

For this Summer of Science Experiment we’re answering that age old question, what is dew?

what is dew?

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Summer of Science: How Raindrops Form


science experiment

My goodness, it’s been crazy around here this year and just when I think things are calming down I get smacked in the face with a rather large stick or a text message saying my name is in the paper for a failure to appear in court.  Don’t worry, the stitches are out, though my gums are still jacked up, and the text was apparently a spammer, the courthouse said I’m all good!  These science experiments have been my little bit of normal and a constant reminder that I still haven’t finalized all our homeschooling plans for this year.  When again should I start pulling my hair out while rocking uncontrollably in the corner of the closet?

Seriously though, have your children ever asked you were does rain come from?  No?  Well wait, they will…and you my friend will be able to explain it all to them after you read through this experiment!

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Summer of Science: Low Pressure




For this Summer of Science experiment we’re demonstrating how low pressure is created and its effects. 

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Summer of Science: DIY Barometer


I swear eventually I’ll blog about more than just science experiments, but once again I’m having health issues, in particular a headache/neck pain/cramping/weirdness.  Deep breathes.


Summer Experiments with Kids

Okay, on with the Summer of Science!  With the storms that have been rolling around the country it seems fitting that we’d be studying weather this month and a big part of meteorology is studying air pressure and the tool for that is a barometer.  The science behind a barometer can be confusing to a child but with just a couple of balloons and jars you can easily explain it.

science experiment for kids
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